Archive for the Pat Williams (Minnesota Vikings) Category


Breaking News: Appeals Court Rules, Williams Wall Will Stand

The Associated Press reported at 10:26 this morning central time that the Appeals Court ruled in favor of the Vikings defensive linemen, Pat and Kevin Williams (not related).

The ruling comes on account that the two Vikings violated the league’s anti-doping policy.

The NFL had tried to suspend the Williamses for four games after they both tested positive for a banned diuretic during training camp in 2008.

They had taken the over-the-counter weight loss supplement StarCaps, which did not state on the label that it contained the diuretic—which can mask the presence of steroids.

Neither Williams tested positive for steroids.

Read more Minnesota Vikings news on BleacherReport.com

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Building The Perfect NFL Player: Defensive Tackle

By Ryan of The Sportmeisters

The players in the trenches do the most work, but probably receive the least amount of credit. From the Offensive Line to the Defensive Line, these mammoths pound into each other with the speed and strength of a mack truck, waiting to see who will yield first.

On the Defensive Line, the Defensive Tackle, also known as the Nose Tackle, is the big monster for the defense. They are designed to swallow up lineman for the linebackers to make the play, or even speed by the Center and Guard on their way to making the stop.

Whether its using strength and size to hold the line, or speed and vision to make the play, having the perfect Defensive Tackle is crucial for victory. So, today, The Sportmeisters build the perfect Defensive Tackle.

Legs: Kevin Willams, Minnesota Vikings

One half of the Williams brothers in Minnesota, Kevin Williams is undoubtedly the faster of the two. With four interceptions, including two in 2007 (one returned for a touchdown), his legs give him the ability to move down the field. It was that speed that also allowed him double digit sacks in 2003 and 2004, and three years of over 50 tackles. Simply put, Kevin Williams, despite being a man in the trenches, can get himself into the backfield as fast as possible. This makes his legs a perfect addition to the perfect Defensive Tackle.

Hands: Tommie Harris, Chicago Bears

Strength lies in the hands for a Defensive Tackle. Whether its grabbing the lineman and taking them out of the play, or plowing himself into the backfield, strong hands make the big difference. Despite injury concerns, Tommie Harris epitomizes strength and power in the hands. He’s had three straight seasons with at least five sacks, and three seasons of over thirty tackles. He’s done all this with less than a full season under his belt since 2005. Strength and power are an important piece of puzzle for the Defensive End, and that comes from the hands of a player like Tommie Harris.

Head: Pat Williams, Minnesota Vikings

We already discussed Kevin Williams being the speed piece of the Minnesota Vikings, but it takes the ability to see the play developing that makes a Defensive Tackle so important. That’s why the head of Pat Williams, the other half of the Minnesota Vikings tandem, brings the vision piece to the perfect Defensive End. Williams uses that vision to amass six seasons of over fifty tackles, including two straight years of over eighty tackles. Despite not many sacks, Williams uses his vision to ensure he gets to the runner in time to prevent the big play.

Body: Jamal Williams, San Diego Chargers

Size matters, especially on the defensive line. With so many offensive lineman now towering over 300 pounds, it take a big man on the other side of the ball to neutralize them. Enter Jamal Williams. At a massive 6’3’’, 348 pounds, Williams’s size makes him a huge asset. His role isn’t to get into the backfield and make the sack or the tackle. Instead, he’s designed to use his size to swallow up the Center and/or Guard, allowing a Linebacker to burst through the hole. This explains why he has only three seasons with over fifty tackles, and his highest sack total is four for a season. However, numbers don’t explain all of the job, and being able to neutralize one or two players on any given play gives an unfair advantage to the San Diego Chargers. The size of Jamal Willams is a huge asset for the perfect Defensive Tackle.

Intangibles: Albert Haynesworth, Washington Redskins

Like it’s been said, a Defensive Tackle is not usually the premier guy on the line, but instead sets up for the Linebacker and Defensive Ends. With Albert Haynesworth, that’s not the case. Lining up at an enormous 6’6’’, 350 lbs, Haynesworth forces offense’s to look at a whole other piece of the puzzle. Despite injury concerns, he has managed two seasons of over fifty tackles, and set a career high with eight and a half sacks in 2008. He’s an extra force in a position that is not used to having key playmakers. That piece alone makes Albert Haynesworth, and all he brings to the table, part of the perfect Defensive Tackle.

In trying to stop the run game and the pass game, a Defensive Tackle has many roles. From gap filler, to lineman neutralizer, to sack master, to just plain unstoppable, a DT must do it all. That’s why everything from speed to vision to strength to size all matter. Add it with a little bit of the “it” factor, and you have the perfect Defensive Tackle.

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Building The Perfect NFL Player: Defensive Tackle

By Ryan of The Sportmeisters

The players in the trenches do the most work, but probably receive the least amount of credit. From the Offensive Line to the Defensive Line, these mammoths pound into each other with the speed and strength of a mack truck, waiting to see who will yield first.

On the Defensive Line, the Defensive Tackle, also known as the Nose Tackle, is the big monster for the defense. They are designed to swallow up lineman for the linebackers to make the play, or even speed by the Center and Guard on their way to making the stop.

Whether its using strength and size to hold the line, or speed and vision to make the play, having the perfect Defensive Tackle is crucial for victory. So, today, The Sportmeisters build the perfect Defensive Tackle.

Legs: Kevin Willams, Minnesota Vikings

One half of the Williams brothers in Minnesota, Kevin Williams is undoubtedly the faster of the two. With four interceptions, including two in 2007 (one returned for a touchdown), his legs give him the ability to move down the field. It was that speed that also allowed him double digit sacks in 2003 and 2004, and three years of over 50 tackles. Simply put, Kevin Williams, despite being a man in the trenches, can get himself into the backfield as fast as possible. This makes his legs a perfect addition to the perfect Defensive Tackle.

Hands: Tommie Harris, Chicago Bears

Strength lies in the hands for a Defensive Tackle. Whether its grabbing the lineman and taking them out of the play, or plowing himself into the backfield, strong hands make the big difference. Despite injury concerns, Tommie Harris epitomizes strength and power in the hands. He’s had three straight seasons with at least five sacks, and three seasons of over thirty tackles. He’s done all this with less than a full season under his belt since 2005. Strength and power are an important piece of puzzle for the Defensive End, and that comes from the hands of a player like Tommie Harris.

Head: Pat Williams, Minnesota Vikings

We already discussed Kevin Williams being the speed piece of the Minnesota Vikings, but it takes the ability to see the play developing that makes a Defensive Tackle so important. That’s why the head of Pat Williams, the other half of the Minnesota Vikings tandem, brings the vision piece to the perfect Defensive End. Williams uses that vision to amass six seasons of over fifty tackles, including two straight years of over eighty tackles. Despite not many sacks, Williams uses his vision to ensure he gets to the runner in time to prevent the big play.

Body: Jamal Williams, San Diego Chargers

Size matters, especially on the defensive line. With so many offensive lineman now towering over 300 pounds, it take a big man on the other side of the ball to neutralize them. Enter Jamal Williams. At a massive 6’3’’, 348 pounds, Williams’s size makes him a huge asset. His role isn’t to get into the backfield and make the sack or the tackle. Instead, he’s designed to use his size to swallow up the Center and/or Guard, allowing a Linebacker to burst through the hole. This explains why he has only three seasons with over fifty tackles, and his highest sack total is four for a season. However, numbers don’t explain all of the job, and being able to neutralize one or two players on any given play gives an unfair advantage to the San Diego Chargers. The size of Jamal Willams is a huge asset for the perfect Defensive Tackle.

Intangibles: Albert Haynesworth, Washington Redskins

Like it’s been said, a Defensive Tackle is not usually the premier guy on the line, but instead sets up for the Linebacker and Defensive Ends. With Albert Haynesworth, that’s not the case. Lining up at an enormous 6’6’’, 350 lbs, Haynesworth forces offense’s to look at a whole other piece of the puzzle. Despite injury concerns, he has managed two seasons of over fifty tackles, and set a career high with eight and a half sacks in 2008. He’s an extra force in a position that is not used to having key playmakers. That piece alone makes Albert Haynesworth, and all he brings to the table, part of the perfect Defensive Tackle.

In trying to stop the run game and the pass game, a Defensive Tackle has many roles. From gap filler, to lineman neutralizer, to sack master, to just plain unstoppable, a DT must do it all. That’s why everything from speed to vision to strength to size all matter. Add it with a little bit of the “it” factor, and you have the perfect Defensive Tackle.

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State of the DTs: Cracks in Vikings’ Williams Wall, or Just Minor Issues?

[This article is one of eight in B/R contributor Jack Harver’s “State of the DTs” series, introduced here.]

Albert Haynesworth’s biggest competition for NFC Pro Bowl honors will come from Minnesota defensive tackles Kevin and Pat Williams.

During their past three seasons manning the middle of the Vikings’ defensive line, the Williams duo has been the engine room for the NFL’s stingiest rush defense. Minnesota’s opponents have averaged less than 71 yards per game on the ground during that span, and Kevin and Pat have been fixtures on the NFC’s Pro Bowl roster since .

Kevin, who has 42.5 career sacks in his six pro seasons, is considered the better pass rusher of the two. Pat, who has played at 320 pounds for the Vikings since arriving at 335 pounds from Buffalo in 2005, uses his massive frame to occupy blockers, freeing the Vikings’ linebackers and other down linemen to make plays. He’s deceptively quick, taking on double teams with his fast movements and sheer bulk.

Minnesota had a few scares involving these two cornerstones of their defense toward the end of last year—situations worth watching going into the 2009 season.

After taking the NFC North lead with a Week 13 win against Chicago, both Willams were suspended for testing positive for a banned weight-loss diuretic. Both Kevin and Pat hunkered down against commissioner Roger Goodell in court just like they’d done against opposing running backs, filing an injunction that stalled the suspension and allowed them to play out the season.

Opinions differ on whether the Williamses will win their protracted legal battle with the NFL as they continue to fight tooth and nail to clear their names and play.

The stakes are particularly high for their reputations: if they are eventually suspended, criticism from pundits and sports fans—already disillusioned by the seeming prevalence of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball—would likely be severe.

Point-blank; if Kevin and Pat Williams come out of court with anything short of a complete victory, they’ll likely be tainted in the public eye. Fair or unfair, they’d have long odds to be voted into the Pro Bowl.

On the football field, Kevin shows no signs of slowing down. A Pro Bowler in four of his six NFL seasons, he has missed only two games in his career—a knee sprain sidelined him for Weeks 13 and 14 in 2005—and is coming off his highest one-season sack total (8.5) since exploding onto the big-league scene with 10.5 and 11.5 in his first two seasons.

Pat, on the other hand, seems to have a few chinks in his formidable armor. He missed the Vikings’ last three games this past season after breaking a bone in his shoulder, but the real points of concern are his offseason surgeries. He had work done on his elbow in 2008, and recently underwent a minor procedure on his knee.

Turning 37 this October, the heftier of Minnesota’s two top-caliber tackles is no spring chicken. Joint injuries tend to nag and recur; while Pat’s level of play may not drop, medical problems might keep him out of enough games to miss out on a fourth consecutive Pro Bowl appearance.

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